drewkitty: (Default)
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I have a real problem with assuming that we're dead. I would wake my partner up so that we could both assume the crash position. We could also both pray. Odds of making a difference either way -- damn close to zero. I'm not going to take that away from my partner, or from me.
drewkitty: (Default)
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Give me a swipe card. EBT would be tolerable. A good general purpose restaurant. Even Subway.

If I had to get a free unlimited supply of "one food" (assuming I could not share) I'd have to go with free-range chicken.
drewkitty: (mooninite)
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Interesting assumptions in the question. Web sites are operated by people. People are responsible for their actions. So I would rephrase the question as:

"Should people be allowed to share confidential corporate and government information with the public?"

No. People are responsible for their actions -- including those who work for corporations and for governments. There is no right to "share" other people's information.

Wikileaks has endangered the national security of the United States and sabotaged important diplomatic and peace-building efforts. A strong case could be made that Wikileaks has killed people. Wikileaks has also revealed important details of corporate and governmental misconduct.

I do not feel that the good has outweighed the bad.
drewkitty: (Default)
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I use my credit union's automated telephone service to check balances, audit transactions and transfer funds. I use their comprehensive Web site for almost all other matters. My credit union membership arms me with more ATMs than even Chase or Bank of America -- just look for the Co-Op Network logo. Anywhere there's a 7-11, I have an ATM.

Yes, my smartphone is smart enough to do Flash. Is yours?

Anyone who banks in a world of credit unions is a moron and has cash to burn. Anyone who banks with Chase in particular is exceptionally stupid and dense.
drewkitty: (Default)
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ATM machines. Convenience stores. Kitchens. The first two are dangerous at night; the third is dangerous all the time.

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drewkitty: (Default)
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Crossing eight lanes of high speed freeway traffic on foot at night to render care to an injured driver, entirely in dark clothing. Not really a close call, per se, except that if I had erred in judging speeds, I would most certainly be deceased with no real hope of survival. I now carry a reflective jacket in my car's emergency equipment.

Performing the duties of a gate guard, I've had to suck asphalt diving out of the way a few times.

Almost got my hand caught in a truck lift gate once. I wasn't the operator.

No car accident that I've been in posed me a threat of serious bodily injury. I've never been in a car during an air bag deployment.

I won't focus on _deliberate_ acts because they fall outside the scope of the call.
drewkitty: (Default)
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What an incredibly biased question. I hope LJ got a pretty penny for the sponsored ad.

Driving is a dangerous psychomotor activity, no doubt about it. Many teens are not capable of driving safely -- especially in peer groups. In California, we have passed a variety of laws to properly regulate teenage driving. Lower BAC for drunk driving, curfews, bans on cell phone use and texting, etc. This can be and should be a state-by-state issue, not a nationwide piece of Federal legislation written by urbanites.

However there are many isolated parts of the country where being without a car is being locked in one's home. There are many safety issues involved as well in rural areas, from taking an injured or ill relative to the hospital (because there are no paramedics!) to access to health and family services.

There are places in California where getting to the local high school is an hour's drive.

To hell with Allstate. If they don't want to sell insurance for teenaged drivers, fine. Outlawing teenaged driving because it's inconvenient to them is another matter entirely.

This is also a strong step towards a national driver's license and Real ID, the long awaited mandatory identification and registration card without which one will be re-classified as a criminal.
drewkitty: (Default)
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From what I hear, Gitmo is a nice place to live for a military base, so I will address only the problems with working at an ultramax facility.

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drewkitty: (Default)
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disturbing )
drewkitty: (Default)
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Or? Why does anyone have to choose?

Ninjas have all their limbs. Pirates risk mere hanging, not impalement. Ninjas can walk on water. Pirates never need to. Ninjas are members of mighty clans. Pirates sing much better songs. Ninjas work in the shadows. Pirates party down. Ninjas are in it for the honor. Pirates get pieces of eight. Ninjas wear black. Pirates fly cool black flags.

Now clearly the true answer is: both! A 21st century data intrusion specialist, or a 16th century rogue ninja shanghaied half way around the world.
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